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Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources

Red River Crops Conference Jan. 28-29 in Altus

ALTUS, Okla. – Texas and Oklahoma producers who raise crops along the Red River border can pick up important tips to promote profitability in their agricultural enterprises by attending the Jan. 28-29 Red River Crops Conference in Altus, Okla.

Gary Stickland, Jackson County Extension director, said the conference will focus on agricultural production circumstances and concerns specific to southwestern Oklahoma and the Texas Rolling Plains.

“Think of it as one-stop shopping where producers of all experience levels can get the latest science-based information and ask questions of leading experts in applicable agricultural disciplines, as well as interact with area producers who may be in situations similar to their own,” he said.

Sponsored by Oklahoma State University Cooperative Extension and Texas A&M AgriLife Extension, the two-day conference will take place at the Southwest Technology Center, located at 711 W. Tamarack Rd. in Altus. Registration is $25 per participant and covers the cost of both days. Registration forms are available through Cooperative Extension county offices in both Oklahoma and Texas.

“Doors will open each day at 8 a.m., with sessions starting at 8:30 a.m. and finishing at approximately 4:15 p.m.,” Strickland said. “Anyone needing additional information about the conference can contact us here at the Jackson County Extension Office in Altus by phoning 580-482-0823.”

Cotton will be the focus of the Jan. 28 sessions, with topics including the latest market outlook, plant variety discussions, herbicide options, seed treatments and disease management, irrigation and new technology.

In-season and summer crops will be featured on Jan. 29. Sessions will include a market outlook and the latest information about wheat breeding, pasture management, climate variability, canola and other specialty crops.

“It was a hardy group of people who chose to settle the upper Red River region in Oklahoma and Texas,” Strickland said. “In spite of many challenges, those early pioneers and their counterparts today have turned the region into a viable agricultural production area of importance to local communities and the economies of each state.”

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REPORTER/MEDIA CONTACT:
Donald Stotts
Communications Specialist
Agricultural Communications Services
143 Agriculture North
Oklahoma State University
Stillwater, OK 74078
Phone: 405-744-4079
Fax: 405-744-5739
Email: donald.stotts@okstate.edu  

Oklahoma State University, U. S. Department of Agriculture, State and Local governments cooperating; Oklahoma State University in compliance with Title VI and VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, Executive Order 11246 as amended, Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, and other federal and state laws and regulations, does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, gender, age, religion, disability, or status as a veteran in any of its policies, practices, or procedures, and is an equal opportunity employer.

 

Oklahoma State University - Stillwater, OK 74078
405.744.5000

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